Can my 18 year claim himself if he made over $11000 this year or do i still have to claim him as a dependant?

Other answer:

Hilario Olvera:
he is under 19… if he lived with you for 6 months last year (including any time away at school) and didn't pay over half of his own support, you can claim and he can not claim himself… see irs pub 17 for support definition… support includes his share of the fair market value of rent, plus utilities, food, insurance ……… it does not include money spent on entertainment or saved…
Suzanne:
he is under 19… if he lived with you for 6 months last year (including any time away at school) and didn't pay over half of his own support, you can claim and he can not claim himself… see irs pub 17 for support definition… support includes his share of the fair market value of rent, plus utilities, food, insurance ……… it does not include money spent on entertainment or saved…
StephenWeinstein:
No one has to claim anyone. If he can't claim himself and no one wants to claim him, then no one claims him. That's totally fine.
ninasgramma:
You are not required to claim a dependent even if you qualify to claim the dependent.

If your child provided over half of his own support, he claims himself. If he did not provide over half of his own support, he cannot claim himself and you may qualify to claim him if you choose.

Amy:
If you financially supported him, and he lived with you or at college, then you claim him. If he got by on his own income, then he claims himself.

He is not supposed to claim hiimself if another taxpayer CAN claim him, regardless of whether you actually do.

Note that the exemption is more valuable to the person in the higher tax bracket, which is probably you.

tro:
you don't 'have' to do anything
if he is eligible to be your dependent, you claim him, in fact if someone qualifies to be a dependent no one else can claim him not even himself
the point is what does he do with the $11K, if he provides more than 50% of his own support–ie pays some rent, buys food, clothes, pays for transportation(and this is not the car payment and car insurance, would be public transportation) then he would qualify not to be your dependent
Judy:
What did he use the 11,000 for? Did he live with you? Pay you rent? The IRS has a worksheet for calculating support. If he provided over half of his own support, he can claim himself, otherwise you claim him.
Pascal the Gambler:
Did he live with you over half the year? Student? Did he pay over half his own expenses?
Higher Mammal:
The choice is his ultimately but if he's living in your home you have a choice to make, let him file as independent and lose your deduction or keep it the way it is. Why not talk to your tax accountant to determine which, of the 2 options really gives the largest deduction so glad you asked now and not 10 weeks from now may your life be full of love, laughter and music
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