How do you know whether your start up business idea will work or fail?

So I stumbled upon an app idea that improves upon a current idea. My idea would save the users lots of time, and be able to do more things at the same time as opposed to doing things one at a time like it currently exists.

Thing is I don't feel that my idea is a "need" necessarily or that this is a

So I stumbled upon an app idea that improves upon a current idea. My idea would save the users lots of time, and be able to do more things at the same time as opposed to doing things one at a time like it currently exists.

Thing is I don't feel that my idea is a "need" necessarily or that this is a problem that "needs" solving. People can take the extra time, this is just a convenient solution.

Snapchat creator said he came up with the idea for his university project and everyone at the end of his presentation told him it's stupid, they hated it and it'd never work, to just drop it.

(Not trying to make another snapchat, that was just an example)

But how do I know if my idea to improve upon something will catch on or will people just not care?

Other answer:

Bill:
It sounds like your idea may just be an enhancement to an similar program. If so, you will need to know if it infringes on an existing patent or trademark. If you are clear to go, you will need to conduct market research to see if this is an item that consumers are willing to pay for and at what cost. There are no guarantees of success. Good Luck
tro:
if your idea has no potential of appealing to a large audience you are not likely to be overly successful
Success:
You make a business plan or hire someone to make your business plan so you can see where the profit and loss is.

Check Fiverr for people who make business plans.

My name is not bruce:
You don't need to fill a "need". There are plenty of small businses owners that earn less than minimum wage. Their businesses are profitable, but since they are not filling a need, really, the market is saturated…. Think of independent convenience stores. If one shuts down, there are millions of others.
You basically just have to plan. Then there is risk and probability involved. The better you plan, the better your chances are of succeeding. I've known people who have started businesses and didn't properly estimate the start-up costs. Some were lucky enough to have the money to fix the problem, others just had to take a loss and basically pack up their dreams of owning a business.
You want to know what the normal issues / costs are, like maintenance….the occurrence is random, but there is a predictable frequency…do you have the money for that. What could go wrong……can you take steps in advance to prevent it? Sometimes you have to plan in advance whats going to make you quit. You never want to "react". Nothing will go according to plan, but if you have the course of action already planned for something similar, it allows you to quickly adapt it. The more you plan, the less you risk and the more probability shifts in your favor.
I implemented a new service at my business once. The investment was $3000….. I couldn't predict at all what my return was going to be on the investment….. I looked at what else I could use that money for and what the return was…. Is that return feasible with my idea???….okay it was. If it wasn't, then i needed to shelf it.
Now, my investment was 85% salvageable..to a point. With my idea, the equipment being used was expected to degrade at a faster rate compared to its intended use. I could re purpose some of the equipment, sell it…..
Soooo, now, the risk wasn't 3000, but 15% of that….$450.00. All costs associated with operations were purely variable cost…. I have other opportunities with a nearly guaranteed return, i'm not risking the opportunity to do those since i can recover most of the investment in case of failure.
I decided it was worth the risk. After 9 months, i made a 20% return….$600.. One piece of equipment, was degrading fairly fast, probably 6 months at most left of useful life, $1000 to replace, but for its intended purpose, it would've lasted for 10 more years. Knowing I would have to make a hefty equipment replacement purchase and planning for it, that alone made me pull the plug. Also, the other investment opportunities would've generated a much higher return. This clearly wasn't working. End of the day, it was profitable, but better opportunities.

Its not so much if your idea will work. Just have to plan so you can manage your risk. Make sure you are in a position that it is okay to fail.

Barkley:
You Ask – do your research. Simple as starting with a survey.
Doctor Yowin:
Convenience is increasingly what people want in place of hard work and failure. Was the automobile needed to replace the horse? One thing leads to another but the over-arching trend has been to gain power in exchange for longevity. You never know until you try.
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