Is scott rowe and the craigslist ads for jobs with Chicago business development group a scam?

Other answer:

Darrell @ Panama City Beach:
Craigslist Chicago En Espanol
Ethel:
Scam
Kittysue:
Never heard of them but here are a few ways to determine job scams on Craigslist:
-Real jobs will ALWAYS interview you IN PERSON at their office before they offer a job, even for legitimate work from home jobs
-Real jobs will NOT interview you by IM or email – they may have an initial phone or Skype interview but then it's followed up by a face to face interview
-Real jobs will NEVER ask you to get a credit check, background check, skills test, etc BEFORE they have interviewed you in person
-Real jobs DO NOT need your home address until after they have offered you a job – then you give it to HR
-Real jobs DO NOT ask people to receive/ship packages from home, print checks from home or handle payments from home.
-Real jobs DO NOT send you a check or ask you to buy any software or other equipment. If there is any equipment or software needed, the company sends it to you or you pick it up from their office
-Real jobs ALWAYS have a verifiable business address and a listed phone number. If you are ever in doubt, just call Directory Assistance. There are no real companies who don't have listed phone numbers
-Real jobs NEVER offer you a job until they have issued and you have returned an I-9 form as required by law. They cannot offer you a job formally before they have verified you can legally work in the country. Speaking English is not enough – there are kids who were illegally brought to the US as babies who speak English perfectly without any accent but that doesn't mean they can legally work

I googled the company name and this is the first thing that came up in a search http://www.bbb.org/chicago/business-revi… — they seem to operate under multiple names if you scroll down to Alternate Business Names
I guess you have to ask yourself if you want to work for a company that gets a D- from the BBB or not

DR + Mrs Bears face:
If they ask you for money for anything or send you a cheque in advance for something then it's a scam.
ErinLeigh:
For the best answers, search on this site https://shorturl.im/ayjCj

100% scam. There is no job. There is only a scammer trying to get you to sign up for some credit reporting site using the affiliate link he provided. He only wanted the commission he would receive for getting people to sign up under him. After you had signed up for the credit site, identity verification site or given your cell number to the IQ test website using the affiliate link provided, that scammer's next email would say: "sorry, the job is filled". Now that you have responded to a scammer, you are on his 'potential sucker' list, he will try again to separate you from your cash. He will send you more emails from his other free email addresses using another of his fake names with all kinds of stories of great jobs, lottery winnings, millions in the bank and desperate, lonely, sexy singles. He will sell you email address to all his scamming buddies who will also send you dozens of fake emails all with the exact same goal, you sending them your cash via Western Union or signing up at a site using the given affiliate link. You could post up the email address and the emails themselves that the scammer is using, it will help make your post more googlable for other suspicious potential victims to find when looking for information. Do you know how to check the header of a received email? If not, you could google for information. Being able to read the header to determine the geographic location an email originated from will help you weed out the most obvious scams and scammers. Then delete and block that scammer. Don't bother to tell him that you know he is a scammer, it isn't worth your effort. He has one job in life, convincing victims to send him their hard-earned cash. Whenever suspicious or just plain curious, google everything, website addresses, names used, companies mentioned, phone numbers given, all email addresses, even sentences from the emails as you might be unpleasantly surprised at what you find already posted online. You can also post/ask here and every scam-warner-anti-fraud-busting site you can find before taking a chance and losing money to a scammer. 6 "Rules to follow" to avoid most fake jobs: 1) Job asks to use your personal bank account and/or open a new one. 2) Job asks you to print/mail/cash a check or money order. 3) Job asks you to use Western Union or moneygram in any capacity. 4) Job asks you to accept packages and re-ship them on to anyone. 5) Job asks you to pay for visas, travel fees via Western Union or moneygram. 6) Job asks you to sign up for a credit reporting, identity verification site or take an IQ test. Avoiding all jobs that mention any of the above listed 'red flags' and you will miss nearly all fake jobs. Only scammers ask you to do any of the above. No. Exceptions. Ever. For any reason. If you google "fake job credit report scam", "fake identity verification site", "fraud job IQ test scam" or something similar you will find hundreds of posts of victims and near victims of this type of scam.

anitra:
Thankyou all for your answers and opinions.
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