Is this a good idea for a product?

For nearly 100 years shoe stores have used a metal caliper to size feet.

We have devised a method using a thin plastic plate with a color display..People place their foot anywhere pad and can read their shoe size instantly.

We also have another version that compares one's foot metrics to a database of

For nearly 100 years shoe stores have used a metal caliper to size feet.

We have devised a method using a thin plastic plate with a color display..People place their foot anywhere pad and can read their shoe size instantly.

We also have another version that compares one's foot metrics to a database of manufacturer's shoe models to find examples of best fitting shoes.

Other answer:

michael:
It is a great idea for the consumer.
The question is "Who is it aimed at?" Who will buy such a system?
Shoe shops will only want it to recommend brands and sizes they sell.
They will not want something that tells a customer that someone else's shoes would be a better fit.
So, I can see the basic 'size/fitting' model having a market.
The 'market intelligence version', for all its brilliant functionality, is unlikely to suit any retailer and will, presumably, be of such infrequent use and high cost and frequent database update requirements as to be unsuitable for consumer purchase.
Maybe foot clinics/podiatrists could offer this service.
John D:
Others have thrown up barriers and I'm certainly no shoe sizing expert. It sounds like at least the kernel of a good idea to me. One of the problems is going to be who's going to buy it so you can make money on it. Certainly it's not a consumer product.
Elaine M:
They already use that with a machine at Walgreens for their shoe inserts/orthodics. It's been done before.

Part of the measuring of feet at a shoe store is that the employee doing the measuring ALSO has to adjust for any person with flat feet, which can change the shoe size by up to 2 sizes. You can't get that from just standing on a chart. I worked in that field for a year. It's not cut and dried with using even the metal unit.

babyboomer1001:
Those old metal ones don't work. They never measured my feet accurately. So, if yours works better, great. Personally though, I don't know why they are needed. A shoe salesman ought to be able to guess a child's size and if it is too small or too big, he can bring out the next size down or up to get the right fit. Are those measurers really necessary?
WRG:
Why would a shoe store spend the money. The Brannock Device does exactly what is needed for a minor one time fee and no ongoing cost or maintenance.
tro:
I don't know any stores that still use those measuring method
if there are enough places to use them that might buy them, replacing those old cumbersome things might be the trick
Nuff Sed:
You could find dozens of similar inventions simply by searching the various FREE patent databases online. You would have to prove yours is somehow "different" from all of those.
Karen:
Yes but consider the costs. If it's too much retailers won't use it. The metal size meter has been working for years.
Devoreal:
OMG that is PURE GENIUS!!!

Remove this post quickly so people do not steal and copy your idea!

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