My husbands mother passed a few months ago . we do not no her insurance co to see who is beneficuary is.how can we find out?

Other answer:

Trena:
First, if no one knows the insurance company, then there probably isn't one. Less than half of those who die have life insurance, and the ones that do should tell someone the insurance company.

Second, if no one knows her insurance company, then it does not matter who the beneficiary is. The only reason to see who is the beneficiary is so that the beneficiary can claim the money from the insurance company, but if the beneficiary doesn't know the insurance company, then no one can claim the money.

The first step is finding the insurance company. If you can't do that, then there's no point to seeing who is the beneficiary, because information is useless if you don't find the insurance company.

Some places you can look to try to find the insurance company include:
Any piece of paper she owned, especially bank records (which may include payments to the insurance company)
Her employer
Her state's Department of Insurance
MIB (they can't tell whether she had insurance, but they can sometimes tell where she applied for insurance, and then you can ask each of those companies, one at a time)

However, it may simply be too late. In many cases, you have to find out while the person is still alive, or forever lose your chance. It doesn't really matter whether she had insurance or not (and she probably didn't) because a person who doesn't tell anyone the insurance company is the same as a person without insurance; either way, no one gets any insurance money.

lucy:
The question should be, (did) mother in law have life insurance or not?

If, she did, then should have in her papers, a policy or paperwork of a company that has life insurance. If, you can't find a policy, then go through her checkbook for any payments to a insurance company that would have been monthly or yearly. If none, then either paid up insurance, or she had no life insurance.

Did mother in law work? If so, "might" have a life insurance with former employer, but, if retired, many times the insurance is cancelled, when they retire.

Last option is MIB, that "might" find out if she applied for "any" life insurance w/in the last 20 years.

IF, in fact she did have life insurance, and once you find out the company, can file a claim with her death certificate. But, only then, can you find out (who) the beneficiary is, and if not your husband, they will tell you.

npk:
Start at the beginning. Does she even HAVE life insurance? If so, the next of kin or executor notifies the insurer and provides the death certificate and any other documentation requested. The insurer will pay to the named beneficiaries only. It's no one else's business who the beneficiaries are.
Bill:
How do you know if she had Insurance? If she had a policy she would have had to pay for the premiums eir directly or through her employer. Check her bills and receipts including any pay stubs to see if payments ere bing made.
B:
are you very sure there is any insurance? normally her former employer would know, or her old check books would show payments made to the insurance companies, you need to dig a bit, normally you could just call the major companies and ask them to check.
Who:
email all the insurance companies you can think of and just ask them if they insured her.

(they may require a physical certified copy of the death certificate, but possibly accept a copy sent by email
you dont send it with the 1st contact email – if they want one before giving out info they will ask you to send it)

Anonymous:
Unless you are either the beneficiary, or the executor of her estate, you don't have a legal right to find out who her beneficiary(ies) are.

So . . . talk to the executor of her estate.

Muzzammil:
Unless you are either the beneficiary, or the executor of her estate, you don't have a legal right to find out who her beneficiary(ies) are.

So . . . talk to the executor of her estate.

Insurance Pickle.com:
You go through her financials to see if she was making any payments and you call former employers.
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